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RSVP Today for SFS Annual General Meeting Nov. 11th !

Our Annual General Meeting will be held on November 11, 2019, at 6:00 – 7:30 pm at the Century Plaza Hotel in Vancouver. Our AGM is sponsored by Century Plaza Hotel and we are extremely grateful that they have offered the Burrard Ballroom for our event. There will be light refreshments provided by our generous sponsors – Wendy Lisogar-Cocchia and Sergio Cocchia , Co-Founders of the Pacific Autism Family Network (PAFN).

We are very grateful for the Honourable Judy Darcy, Minister of Mental Health and Addictions, who is our guest speaker. The AGM is a great time to hear how the previous year unfolded for the Stigma-Free Society and to learn about plans for the upcoming year. Please let us know if you plan to attend as we would love to see you.

RSVP by Friday, November 8th, 2019

E-mail: Andrea.Paquette@stigmafreezone.com to RSVP Today!

Thank you to Wendy and Sergio who are also Co-Founders of the Pacific Autism Family Network (PAFN) where the Good Life Fitness Autism Hub is the first Stigma-Free Zone Charity in Canada!

Thank you for your amazing and ongoing support. 🙂

~The Stigma-Free Society Team

Hiring a new Stigma-Free Zone School and Community Presenter in Metro Vancouver

The Stigma-Free Society is currently looking to hire an additional Stigma-Free Zone School and Community Presenter to join our Metro Vancouver team!

The Stigma-Free Society provides education and awareness about the effects of stigma, as well as peer support for those facing personal challenges in hopes of fostering acceptance of ourselves and others. One of our primary programs is the Stigma-Free Zone School Program that is delivered provincially.

We are looking for an extraordinary individual to tell their amazing personal story of hope and resiliency in schools to small and large groups in Metro Vancouver only. With an initial focus on mental health, we have now expanded our mandate to include all stigmas under the Stigma-Free banner (www.stigmafreesociety.com) such as LGBTQ2+, homelessness, race, substance use, etc. If you have a powerful story of overcoming obstacles and dealing with stigma, be it societal stigma or self-stigma, we welcome your application.

We are seeking a school and community presenter with passion and positivity–someone who has lived through and overcome many challenges. If you are truly inspired to share your story with youth in schools (grades 7-12) and occasionally with adults at businesses and organizations, then please keep reading.

This position best suits someone who is VERY accepting and comfortable with themselves and their personal circumstances and is not afraid to talk about their struggles in a public forum. This someone wants to shout their story from the rooftops because they feel that their experiences will make a difference in the lives of others.

A Stigma-Free Zone Presenter must:

  • Be professional and possess experience in public speaking;
  • Be open-minded and willing to learn from different perspectives while taking direction from the President of Stigma-Free Society;
  • Have a positive, respectful attitude and a willingness to be open and authentic;
  • Be comfortable with public speaking and presenting to small or large audiences;
  • Be self-motivated, punctual, and able to adapt to changing situations;
  • Have an engaging and impacting personal story to share;
  • Prior experience working with youth is an asset

Further Important Details: 

  • You will create a PowerPoint presentation with the Society’s guidance and it must be suitable for youth in grades 7-12, which is also used for community presentations;
  • You will be presenting between 45 to 90 minutes to classes or assemblies and various groups in the community;
  • We will train you. The training will generally take about up to 3 weeks to complete (part-time) and you will be paid $400 when the training is complete;
  • We want to put out a very positive message and we welcome stories that are tough. We are seeking applicants who have been through a great deal to get to where they are today and we will work with you to share your story that will encourage others;
  • It is very key to know that if hired, we ask you to commit to work with us for one school year and absolutely no shorter please as it take a great amount of resources to train staff;
  • There is not an average number of presentations promised, but enough that is rewarding and will give you the skills and practice you need to keep you engaged;
  • We expect you to be aware and educated about various marginalized communities and on what available mental health resources exist in the community; and
  • We pay you a flat rate of $100 per presentation – this fee includes all of your expenses, including gas/mileage.

*ESSENTIAL DETAILS TO NOTE – You will be contracted during the school year with summers off. This position is best suited to someone who has a part-time job and/or plenty of flexibility in their schedule. We offer a minimum of 2 weeks’ notice for each presentation, so you can plan ahead. We are accommodating and respectful of your time, but it is preferred that presenters have an adequate amount of availability as determined by the President, SFS.

*You require a guaranteed means of transport to and from your presentation. Public transportation is not acceptable as it is very important you show up at schools and community organizations 20 minutes for set-up before a presentation and many schools and places are not accessible by public transit.

We would really love to hear from you and have you join our amazing Stigma-Free Society Team.

Please be sure to describe in your Cover Letter why you believe you have a powerful story to share. APPLICATIONS WITHOUT A COVER LETTER WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED. 

Remember that no matter what our challenges, we can all live extraordinary lives!

Job Type: Casual (You are deemed a contractor, not an employee of the Society)

Jason: 1 – Stigma: 0 – My Battle with Mental Illness at Home and in the Workplace

I was diagnosed with a mental illness at 29 years old, but the greatest challenge I faced wasn’t the illness itself. It is was the suffocating stigma that came with it.

I am speaking of the stigma that still surrounds mental illness, and the lack of empathy and understanding that follows – and that’s at best. At worst, blatant discrimination is the result. Stigma is inappropriate, unnecessary and offensive. But, unlike mental illness, we have the power to overcome stigma.

Mental illness can be treated – but stigma can be cured.

I came to this realization through the unique experience of being diagnosed with both a major physical illness and a mental illness. The former was a rare nerve defect in my heart that began causing symptoms at 9 years old, and ultimately lead to open-heart surgery at 12 years old. During the entire experience I was overwhelmed with support, love – and a complete lack of stigma. Who would look at a young boy with a heart problem and think his character was in question? Or ask him to just “try harder” or “get more exercise”?

The latter was bipolar disorder, the symptoms of which began appearing in 2002 and progressively worsened until 2005, when I had a 6-day manic episode that resulted in a forced 2-week stay in psychiatric hospital. During those tumultuous three years, bipolar disorder nearly destroyed my life.

It was in comparing these two experiences, both personally and professionally, that I realized the destructive power of stigma, which is very prevalent with respect to mental illness and yet non-existent with other, more known illnesses.

The reality was that years after fixing one major organ with open-heart surgery, it appeared another, this time my brain, wasn’t working properly. Despite the similarities of the illnesses – in both cases, a major organ had a biological failure that created dramatic symptoms – there was nothing similar about the two experiences. First, there was the challenge of self-stigma, which was so strong that for nearly two years I refused treatment and actually tried to find my way back to health through the sheer force of will and determination (as though that was a viable option).

Stigma also reared its ugly head in a second, external way. This time it came in the form of confusion, discomfort, judgment and at times outright discrimination in the minds of those around me. This happened regularly, and not only with those in my professional life, but also those in my social life and family. It was jarring to realize that all of the support, unconditional love and empathy that came my way when my heart wasn’t working was nowhere to be seen now that my brain was failing.

After finally winning the battle against stigma, I began to treat my illness properly – as a medical illness that required my attention, research and, ultimately, treatment. This approach lead to a successful return to full health within 6 months of being hospitalized and diagnosed and, for the vast majority of the days since June, 2005, I have been living well, free of the worst symptoms of bipolar disorder. I work very hard to manage my illness and maintain my physical and mental health, and it isn’t always easy or perfect, but approaching my illness with zero stigma has helped immeasurably.

Once I fully ‘owned’ my illness, I realized I had the opportunity to help others by sharing my experience. Very few people have faced both a physical and mental illness, recovered, are willing to speak about it, and are effective public speakers. My degree in Theatre and Speech Communication provided the final ingredient.

So, in 2006, I started talking. From 2006 to 2015, I delivered over 40 keynotes as a volunteer on behalf of AMI QC, a Montreal-based organization that helps caregivers of those facing mental illness, and also provides outreach education. In 2015, after years of seeing the positive impact of sharing my message, I founded StigmaZero to work towards a future without stigma by helping employers eradicate stigma in their workplaces, so they can better manage mental illness as it arises in their workplace.

My message was, and still is, very clear: stigma continues to exist regarding mental illness because of fear and a lack of understanding. It may often be innocent, but it doesn’t belong, and education is the first step toward eradicating it. We should never again speak of mental illness in any other terms than what it is – an illness.

If you know someone who suffers from a mental illness (and statistics say that you probably do) or if you suffer from one yourself, be a part of the effort to end the stigma.

Stigma is something we have the power to cure.  Let’s get rid of it.

Jason Finucan

Founder, StigmaZero

Author of the book Jason: 1, Stigma: 0 – My battle with mental illness at home and in the workplace

Jason Finucan is a mental health advocate, stigma fighter, professional speaker, founder of StigmaZero and instructor of the programs found within The StigmaZero Online Training Academy.

Visit www.stigmazero.com for more information, and www.stigmazero.com/book to purchase the book.

Meet our Stigma-Free Society – Otsuka-Lundbeck Alliance Scholarship Winner!

Many students on campus are carrying around more than just heavy textbooks. Not only burdened by the pressures of fitting in, and keeping up high grades, some students are facing hidden adversity made worse by the effects of stigma.

Ruzzelle – Stigma-Free Society Scholarship Winner

With the support of Otsuka-Lundbeck Alliance, we were able to give two deserving students who have overcome societal and self-stigma a scholarship to put towards their post-secondary program of choice. One of our two scholarship winners, Ruzzelle, began having mental health issues in high school but didn’t believe that getting help from a professional was an option.

“I almost failed my first year of University”, she says, “and it wasn’t until I started to see somebody later on that I could slowly get a handle on just living.” Mental health wasn’t something Ruzzelle’s friends in high school talked about, and like many families, hers did not talk about mental illness in a constructive way. “When I told them I was depressed, they wanted to take me to Disney Land because it’s the happiest place on earth! They just wanted me to get better and they didn’t know how.” Eventually, her family offered her the financial support to see a counselor.

The counseling sessions helped Ruzzelle become aware of her self-defeating thoughts, self-stigma being among them. She spent years struggling to simply get out of bed, but for a long time, felt that it was a problem best handled alone.  Now Ruzzelle says, “I feel like the anxious thoughts are more manageable now, I think because I’ve had all this practice, time and support.”

Now that she has the support she needs, Ruzzelle is completing a Masters Degree in Speech-Language Pathology. “I’m entering a field where I’m going to be able to help other people go through their own journey of stigma which is amazing. I never thought I’d be able to do that.”

We asked Ruzzelle how it felt to receive a scholarship based on her experiences of overcoming stigma and she responded, “I felt very supported. I heard all this bad news in the media all the time, but hearing what one non-profit is doing for students about stigma is amazing. One of the good pieces of news that I need.”

When asked what she would say to other students suffering from the effects of societal or self-stigma, Ruzzelle would like them to know that, “You’re not alone in your journey. All it takes is one person to really listen to you and it can be life changing.”

Congratulations Ruzzelle and all the best in your Masters Program!

Thank you to Lundbeck Canada and Otsuka Canada Pharmaceuticals Inc.for making the Stigma-Free Society Scholarships possible.

Join the Stigma-Free Society Team! Recruiting a Vancouver Stigma-Free Zone Presenter!

The Stigma-Free Society is currently looking to hire an additional Stigma-Free Zone School Presenter to join our team!

The Stigma-Free Society provides education and awareness about the effects of stigma, as well as peer support for those facing personal challenges in hopes of fostering acceptance of ourselves and others. One of our primary programs is the Stigma-Free Zone School Program.

We are looking for an extraordinary individual to tell their amazing personal story of hope and resiliency in schools to small and large groups. With an initial focus on mental health, we have now expanded our mandate to include all stigmas under the Stigma-Free Zone banner (www.stigmafreesociety.com) with an emphasis on mental health, LGBTQ2+, homelessness, race, and substance use. If you have a powerful story of overcoming obstacles and dealing with stigma, be it societal stigma or self-stigma, we welcome your application.

We are seeking a school presenter with passion and positivity–someone who has lived through and overcome many challenges. If you are truly inspired to share your story with youth in schools (grades 7-12) and occasionally with adults at businesses and organizations, then please keep reading!

This position best suits someone who is VERY accepting and comfortable with themselves and their personal circumstances and is not afraid to talk about their struggles in a public forum. This someone wants to shout their story from the rooftops because they feel that their experiences will make a difference in the lives of others.

A Stigma-Free Zone Presenter must:

  • Be professional and possess experience in public speaking;
  • Be open-minded and willing to learn from different perspectives;
  • Have a positive, respectful attitude and a willingness to be open and authentic;
  • Be comfortable with public speaking and presenting to small or large audiences;
  • Be self-motivated, punctual, and able to take direction;
  • Have an engaging and impacting personal story to share;
  • Prior experience working with youth is an asset

Further Details: 

  • You will create a PowerPoint presentation with the Society’s guidance and it must be suitable for youth in grades 7-12;
  • You will be presenting between 45 to 90 minutes to classes or assemblies and various groups in the community;
  • We will train you. The training will generally take about 2-3 weeks to complete (part-time) and you will be paid $400;
  • We want to put out a very positive message and we welcome stories that are tough. We are seeking applicants who have been through a great deal to get to where they are today and we will work with you to share your story that will encourage others;
  • It is very key to know that if hired, we ask you to commit to work with us for 1 year;
  • There is not an average number of presentations promised, but enough that is rewarding and will give you the skills and practice you need to keep you inspired;
  • We expect you to be aware and educated about various marginalized communities and on what available mental health resources exist in the community; and
  • We pay you a flat rate of $100 per presentation – this fee includes all of your expenses, including gas.

*VERY IMPORTANT TO NOTE – You will be contracted during the school year with summers off. This position is best suited to someone who has a part-time job and/or plenty of flexibility in their schedule. We offer a minimum of 2 weeks’ notice for each presentation, so you can plan ahead.

**You require a guaranteed means of transport to and from your presentation. Public transportation is not acceptable as it is very important you are to show up at schools 20 minutes for set-up before a presentation and many schools are not accessible by public transit.

We would really love to hear from you and have you join our amazing Stigma-Free Society Team. Please be sure to describe in your Cover Letter why you believe you have a powerful story to share.

 

APPLICATIONS WITHOUT A COVER LETTER WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED. 

Remember that no matter what our challenges, we can all live extraordinary lives!

We look forward to receiving your resume and cover letter at: robyn@stigmafreezone.com 

Thank you 🙂

Let’s Talk at Glenlyon Norfolk School with EJ Weston

On January 30, Middle and Senior School Assemblies included presentations by EJ Weston, a School and Community speaker from the Stigma-Free Society on the topic of stigma with a special focus on mental health.

With a focus on resilience and hope, EJ shared their own personal experience with mental illness, overcoming trauma, and the importance of self care. The thought-provoking talk was an excellent way to reach students with important information, and provided a framework that will encourage them to work together to create an environment free of judgement and stigma.

Please view Glenlyon Norfolk School’s newsletter HERE

Thank you so much to Glenlyon Norfolk School for supporting the Stigma-Free Zone Movement.

A CHAOTIC ROLLER  COASTER  RIDE  OF  MELANCHOLIC  MOODS  and  RAPID  CYCLING  EUPHORIA

I would describe my life as…

A CHAOTIC ROLLER  COASTER  RIDE  OF  MELANCHOLIC  MOODS  FOLLOWED BY  RAPID  CYCLING  EUPHORIA

I was born this way.   I also knew I was different from a very early age. It was like I had many faces and each face had a different mood, and I never knew which mood would suddenly  appear.   I have Cyclothymic Bipolar Disorder which means I don’t have a low mood period or a high manic period rather a constant fluctuation of moods with rapid cycling.

I have had one serious episode of suicidal thoughts in my life, it happened when I was sixteen and living in foster home.

Before I was 13 years old I started getting into trouble, hanging with a bad crowd. I was still having mania racing thoughts every day and was always hypersensitive. My mind was so full of ideas and emotions that I couldn’t deal with them and I acted out by running away, stealing, fighting, taking drugs, drinking. My dad eventually placed me in foster care when i was 13 hoping a family with a mom would settle me down…it didn’t.

Stigma-Free Zones

I thought it was me that was behaving badly…It wasn’t till I was in my thirties that I was actually diagnosed…what a difference that made…finally some closure.  Turns out I also have ADHD, Social Anxiety Disorder and Personality Disorder. I’m surprised that I’m still alive and married to a wonderful woman.

I’d like to summarize my life to share more about the in-depth part of me. My mother died when i was 9. I have 6 sisters and 2 brothers. My older brother Dave has schizophrenia and bipolar living on the streets. I found him about 10 years ago while searching with my wife. He refused to acknowledge me as his brother and asked me to never come see him again. I miss him. My brother John was a heroin addict in his teens but found religion and is living his life  devoted to Christ. I guess that is the better route to go, God before drugs. I’m happy he is happy.

After mom died…

…our childhood home burned to the ground.

…my sisters all turned out OK.

…my sisters held dad close, me & my brothers never were let in.

…the boys were the ones affected.

My foster parents beat me for acting out and punished me by withholding food. I think that’s why today I have an eating disorder; I can binge eat even when I’m full I fear i won’t get more. I’m working with my psychiatrist on this issue along with others. I had an affair not because I wanted to but because of impulsive nature while off my medication.

On the bright side I have a wonderful supporting wife who has stood by me through everything, a family that supports me and grandchildren whom I adore.

I became a nurse…

…to help others understand what they were going through

…to help others realize that they are not alone

… as therapy for myself.

I loved being a nurse but my illness didn’t allow me to work for long. So, after 13 years of nursing i was forced to retire and go on benefits at 50 years old.

I have made some lifelong friends, something i never would have been able to do in my younger days, because in those days I burned bridges.

I take medication every day.  While on meds, I sometimes felt like I could save the world, which I can’t, so I would stop taking them. But nothing good came of that.  I have been seeing a psychiatrist once a month for the last 7 years and it helps.

Today I am somewhat stable although I still cycle and always will, but now I know the reasons why. It is hard knowing I will never work again because of my mental state.

There is so much more about me I’d love to share and so much more I have to offer. I’m looking forward to hearing back from you.

Thank you for listening to some of my story.

Author, Steve von Kanel

You are Invited to our Stigma-Free Zone Community Event March 20th, 2018

Victoria to Become First-Ever Stigma-Free City in Canada: Community Event

In partnership with the City of Victoria, the Stigma-Free Society is hosting a Stigma-Free Zone Community Event on March 20th, 2018. The purpose of this event is to ignite dialogue around mental health and stigma, and to announce that the City of Victoria is committing to working toward their Stigma-Free Zone designation for City hall and eventually the city itself.

The event will take place on March 20th from 6:00pm to 7:30pm in the Garry Oak Room at the Fairfield Community Centre, 1335 Thurlow Rd. Elected officials, community leaders, general public and media outlets are invited to attend.

Mayor Lisa Helps and Councillor Jeremy Loveday will discuss the importance of mental health and strategies to make the City of Victoria a Stigma-Free Zone. Andrea Paquette, President, Stigma-Free Society, and Robyn Thomas, Community Development Manager for Vancouver Island, will also share their authentic and honest journeys through mental illness and stigma.

The Stigma-Free Zone Movement was co-founded by Andrea Paquette, President and Stigma-Free Society and Dave Richardson, Board Chair, and the movement is focused on Metro Vancouver and Vancouver Island in an effort to turn awareness of stigma into concrete actions.

“The City of Victoria’s commitment to become a Stigma-Free Zone is a significant step and we hope that other cities throughout BC and eventually Canada will follow,” says Paquette.

Schools, businesses/ organizations, and geographical areas may all be designated as a Stigma-Free Zone. Specific stigma-reducing activities, hosting mental health presentations, as well as conducting a needs assessment are examples of the criteria involved in becoming a Stigma-Free Zone.

More information on Stigma-Free Zones may be found at: www.stigmafreezone.com
The Stigma-Free Society is a registered Canadian Charity with a true grass-roots history, born in Victoria in 2010. The Society has designed programs providing education about stigmas with an emphasis on mental health, and offers peer support for those facing mental health challenges.

You must register for the event to attend, so we can determine refreshments and such. 🙂

CLICK LINK: REGISTER HERE

Teens2Twenties Support Group Inspires Resilience

“Knowing that I’m not alone in my struggles makes a huge difference”, writes one of the youth from our Teens2Twenties Support Group—our drop-in program for youth dealing with mental heath challenges. The group runs every Thursday from 7:00 – 8:30pm at the Quadra Village Community Center in Victoria, B.C.

With mental health at the forefront of many awareness campaigns, it is easy to forget that many people still suffer in silence. Even though the conversation has started, many of us with mental health challenges often feel isolated and afraid.

Working with youth who are dealing with so much adversity, yet still showing up and bearing their souls, is so inspiring to me. To come into a room full of strangers and open up about what’s really going on beneath the surface can be so intimidating, especially when social anxiety is part of the equation. Even as the group facilitator, I often find it difficult to be really honest about where I’m at sometimes.

We’re so conditioned to say that things are fine, to avoid being a “downer”, to not take up too much time.  Yet it is exactly in taking that time to open up, and risk being seen, that other people start to feel less alone. Some space can open up to feel a little lighter, to realize that even if things aren’t all good, they are still going to be okay. I love the sense of humor that young people have. Things can be challenging, but there is always something to laugh about. I have learned so much about resilience since working with the youth that attend the Teens2Twenties Support Group.

Something I love about our group is that people are open to trying new things. We’ve gone on sunset hikes, attended poetry slams, and discovered some tremendous artistic talent during art nights. Mental health challenges can make social outings difficult, but they don’t have to be a barrier. Especially when we know we’re not alone in our fears.

When we are not fighting to get by on our own, we have the strength and compassion to lift each other up and keep going.

With appreciation for the Teens2Twenties Support Group participants, I applaud and appreciate you.

~Robyn Thomas, Lead Facilitator, Teens2Twenties Support Group

Hope is the Bird who Feels the Light and Sings while the Dawn is still Dark

Bonjour, I’m Pauline. It’s a privilege to offer my experience to your understanding of bipolar disorder and dual diagnosis with substance abuse. I once self medicated with alcohol, but now have 11 years of sobriety. May I begin by respectfully acknowledging the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations on whose traditional and unceded territories I live, work and play.

I’m a 55 year old mother of three, Nani-Ji to a half Punjabi Grandson, and I’ve spent 35 yrs being the wife of a saint. I’m a daughter, sister, friend, teacher, mentor and colleague. Many people are affected by having this ‘soul sickness.’ Besides social dysfunction, I have suffered from denial, which presented a barrier to accessing care and finding interpersonal healing.

In the last 16 yrs, I have been on 10 medications, and now fine tuned on three. Honing my insight, I am at my healthiest yet, with the expertise of my psychiatrist and psychologist. In my own mind, it is far easier to relinquish alcohol and gain a clear mind than give up the highs of mania. I had resisted adequate treatment fearing “a root canal of my soul”. To compound denial, my eccentricities were encouraged by all except those closest to me. I was lauded for my flamboyance, generosity and humour. Coercion to step up treatment occurred in 2014, when for one day, I found myself psychotic after many sleepless nights in pain. I was rescued by my family and kept safe in five point restraints over night. This, my only hospitalization, lasted 1 month. Besides avoiding hospitalization, the imperatives to accept aggressive treatment also included avoiding depression and dementia, both associated with brain burnout from the highs. Less ups means less downs.

Depression is waking to the disgust within the nostrils of my rotting body. It is the compulsion to take all my pills and slip under the bath water, a profound inertia confining me to days of indecision and bird watching from the sofa. Where can one find hope? In the words of Tagore; “Hope is the bird who feels the light and sings while the dawn is still dark.”

For patients suffering, hope in mental illness is the gift that treatment extends into the darkness. To the many scientists and clinicians who have played a part in this miracle of healing, I give my deepest gratitude. Treatment resulted in dampening my inner world of symbols and connections. Purpose and significance, I now share with others. I am abstinent of spirituality; which has been replaced with reasoned atheism and measured forays into transcendence. I still write poetry, but much less prolifically. And I am more objective about their quality.

Ecstasy is replaced with peace.
Unpredictability becomes constancy.
Impulsivity is stayed with pause.
Multitasking concedes to completing one.
Irritability softened into patience.
Restlessness is answered by acceptance.
Overconfidence yields to humility.
Bragging surrenders to confidentiality.
Interrupting quiets for listening.
Over-sharing is set aside for curiosity.
A monologue of opinions opens to dialogue.
Gregariousness settles in self-contentment.
Flirtation returns to loyalty.
Extravagance levels into moderation.
Risk taking is tempered with caution.
Selfishness imbued with empathy.
Insomnia crushed by sonorous coma.

I don’t miss drinking whatsoever, but I do miss my highs. I doubt myself when I am feeling good, worried I am escalating. Rebuilding self-trust is by one deserved day at a time. I am grateful to have got a grip before I lost everything I cherish. I am thankful for effective treatment, for wholeness and the chance to renegotiate my identity and rediscover my soul.

~Pauline

Funders